Memorize Maths Formulas

In this section I am not going to go into depth as to how to do various aspects of mathematics, but to show you how to remember formula and symbols.

When I was in college, I did actually use the techniques I am going to show you to remember formula.

Formula looks nasty. There’s no nice way to put it. Big long formulas that you have to learn off by heart and the only way you know them is by saying them out parrot fashion. “… Plus minus B, square root A squared minus B squared over 4 AC …” etc. You get the picture.

Usually you would do some example questions using the formula so as you can see it working. All too easily though the formulas are forgotten. Not to worry. What I am going to show you will make you remember the formula forever. Unfortunately (some may think) you will never forget it!

Starting off with a simple formula, one I think most of us will have come across many times while at school.

Area of a circle = ?r²

This formula is really quite simple, most of you may even know this off by heart. But as an example, I will show you how I would remember this formula had I not already known it.

So, it is the area of a circle we are looking for. I need to find an association with area of a circle. Well a circle usually reminds me of one of those round abouts that children would play on. You held onto a railing and pushed the round about round and round!

Ok, so we have our scene, the roundabout.

The symbol, ?, is called Pi, pronounced pie (the food).

So I would imagine lots and lots of pies piled onto the round about.

That’s the first part of the scene. Next, the r²

R is the 18th letter of the alphabet. 18 is broken down to A H from learning the 100 people which you should have done by now. A H is, in my list, Adolf Hitler. He also has an action, the Heil Hitler arm raising action.

So Adolf Hitler would be standing beside the round about as the pies are spinning round and round.

So this is the scene:

The pies are spinning round and round really fast. So fast in fact that they begin to fly off the round about. Standing nearby is Adolf Hitler defending himself from the pies by doing his Hitler Salute. He may even be catching some pies with his mouth and eating them!

The fact that I am using Adolf Hitler and his action, emphasises that the number 18 is being used twice. Counting 18 letters of the alphabet will give you R. Two R’s is r²

The Quotient Rule is used to differentiate a y value of the form u/v.

The formula is:

So, the question is how do we begin to remember this?

Using the names and letters that we learned earlier the task of remembering the formula will prove to be quite easy.

Take the d/dx part first. Well this does come up in calculus etc quite a lot. The best thing to do in this instance is to memorize something that represents those letters. It makes me think if my friend Dee, short for Deirdre, and dx makes me think of ducks. So I could have my friend Dee, with feathers and a duck’s bill!

Next, u/v makes me think of UV sunlight, so I would probably imagine a pair of sunglasses to symbolize u/v!

So that’s the start of it. I don’t want to tell you how to do it exactly, as it will not be the same for you. What you imagine first will be far better than learning what I imagined first. It is easy for me to recall as it is what I imagined. The same will be easy for you too.

Here’s a good one. What’s ?2 ? I wish I knew

That’s the answer! Each word represents the number of letters needed to give you the answer, so I = 1, wish = 4, I = 1, knew = 4: so ?2 = 1.414

So if you do want to discuss this formula and how to remember it, please post your comments below with how far you have gotten with remembering it… It will be better for you in the long run to learn it. I will help you where I can.



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